Music Lessons In Early Childhood May Improve Brain’s Performance

Taking Music Lessons As A Child Could Physically Change Your Brain

Each had a magnetic resonance scan to measure the thickness of the cortex and the volume of grey matter in their brains. After taking gender and the number of years spent having music lessons into account, Wang found that musical training that started before the age of seven appeared to thicken areas of the brain involved in language skills and executive function, which is a person’s ability to plan and carry out tasks. She presented the results at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in San Diego. “We’re not sure why these changes arise, but a reasonable explanation is that early starters might rely more on auditory clues during learning music, since it might be more difficult for younger children to read music,” Wang said. The findings build on earlier work that suggests musical training before the age of seven can have a significant impact on the brain’s development.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/nov/12/music-lessons-early-childhood-brain-performance

The researchers from the University of Kansas Medical Center found that the people who had the most musical training in their lives had the best mental sharpness, and scored the highest on brain functioning tests. Prevents Heart Transplant Rejection (In Mice) It may so far only be shown in mice, but it’s still pretty amazing: Japanese researchers found that exposing mice to certain kinds of music was linked with “prolonged survival” after a heart transplant, Miller-McCune reported. The mice in the study were exposed to either Mozart, Verdi (opera music), New Age-type music, no music at all, or a sound frequency.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/14/music-lessons-brain-child-physical-changes_n_4260917.html

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